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Entries from September 2017

Collection Highlight E395295: Cup and Pin Game

E395295
How would you play with this toy? This game, “Tapaga ‘Towan”, is called both a “Ring-and-Pin game” and a “Cup-and-Pin game” in our records.  It was played by tossing the cups in the air and trying to catch them on the pin.   It is made out of fibers of dressed skin, and what look like small cups carved out of ivory. Associated with the Montagnais people, it was collected by Rev. John M. Cooper near James Bay, Quebec, and accessioned by the museum on the 6th of July, 1956.

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Collection Highlight E153500: Flesher

E153500
While this object looks like it may have been used as a hunting implement or food processor, it was actually used to scrape the inside of hides as they were being processed. This flesher, or “Machequat” according to the information we have, is made of iron or steel, fibers, and dressed skin. It is affiliated with the Innu people and was collected near Labrador, Canada by Henry G. Bryant. It was collected in August or September of 1891 and accessioned by the museum on the 14th of January, 1892.

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Collection Highlight E45062: Darts used in Gaming

E45062
This dart was used as part of a game. According to our catalogue information, boys and men would set up a series of stakes at which they would throw these darts, attempting to knock them down. The person who was able to take down the most stakes would win the pile of stakes and barbs. This particular dart was collected near Sledge Island in the Norton Sound, AK by Edward Nelson and accessioned by the museum in 1880.


Collection Highlight E402926: Leather Moccasins

E402926
This pair is just one example of the many different, beautiful moccasins we have in our collections from very diverse cultural groups. These moccasins, made out of leather and decorated with cloth and glass beads, are associated with the Innu or Naskapi people. They were collected by Dr. William Strong near Labrador, Canada, and donated to the museum by Dr. Matthew Stirling. They were accessioned by the museum on the 7th of August, 1964.

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