DCSIMG

Collection Highlight E48851: Shuttlecock

E48851
This item from our collections perhaps seems unfamiliar at first, but if you take a closer look you might recognize a familiar object.  It’s a shuttlecock! Shuttlecocks, also referred to as “birdies”, are what get batted back and forth during a game of badminton. This shuttlecock has a head made of wound fibers, which serves as a weight, and a tail of feathers. The feathers, traditionally taken from only one wing of a bird, help keep the shuttlecock aerodynamic. These days we tend to use commercially manufactured plastic and rubber shuttlecocks. This object was donated by Edward Nelson, accessioned on Feb 9th, 1882, and collected near the Lower Yukon River.  

Explore more objects and images on our online database!


New Interdisciplinary Curricula From the Alaska Arctic Studies Center Office

NewAlaskaCurricula

The Alaska Office of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center has produced two new interdisciplinary curricula available as free downloads from the Sharing Knowledge Alaska website:
Salmon Give Life: Learning from Alaska's First Peoples
Gifts from the Land: Lifeways and Quill Art of the Athabascan Peoples
 
Sourced from free, online resources about Alaska Native cultures and extending to other fields, the lessons offer broad educational experiences. Students learn about Alaska Native peoples, including traditional knowledge, subsistence practices, languages and values. Activities include researching porcupines and salmon; learning to make things with quills and salmon skin; and exploring museum collections. Materials include instructions for teachers, student handouts, answer keys, correlations to culturally responsive schools and Alaska state standards, selected resources and enrichment activities. The resources are for high school level students, but they can be adapted to meet other classroom and homeschool needs.
 
Go to the Sharing Knowledge Alaska website at https://naturalhistory.si.edu/arctic/html/sharing-knowledge-alaska/Index.html or search online for: National Museum of Natural History Sharing Knowledge Alaska. Click on the Educational Resources page to find the two new curricula and three additional ones.

 


SOLSTICE 2017

Solstice

 

Join us next week
Tuesday - Wednesday for the
Solstice 2017 celebration


UTC+5 at International Date Line (June 20)

(12 am East Coast/South America,
6 am Central Europe/Africa, June 21)

 

To all Solstice celebrators:

We're writing to you today with some last minute news regarding the 2017 Solstice celebration, which happens next week, June 20-21.

We are expanding on the 24-hour show from last year, which featured contributions from over 60 artists, scientist, musicians and more.
One of the main new elements this year is footage from the Smithsonian Institute about kayaks and canoes. These crafts were the first inventions that offered humanity a shot at expanding their horizon and traveling beyond their place of birth, opening up connections to a new world. We like to keep expanding on these inventions, and with each recurring annual Solstice celebration, we hope to be increasing the level of worldwide connectivity to share people's creativity, culture and innovative ideas. 

This year we are also celebrating on an online platform, through Google Hangouts, which is easily accessible through any mobile phone, with live hosting from a fabulous team at the Kapsakki Theater in Helsinki, Finland, where it all gets mixed and monitored.

We urge you to please take a moment to tune in to our website or the hangouts and check out the video, as well as some live contributions from New York, L.A., Beijing, Finland and more. If you would like to actively contribute with music, poetry or other creative work from a remote location, please let us know where you will be next week on June 20-21, and if a ndwhat time you would be interested to 'beam in' so we can have you on the broadcast schedule. Otherwise, we hope you will just take a moment to enjoy the show!

Looking forward to hearing back from you and to connect again.

— Charlie Morrow and the Solstice24 team

 


Solstice 2017 viewing 
Happy Hour - 17:00 - 18:00 
Tuesday-Wednesday, 20-21 June
24 time zones - 24 hours


www.solstice24.com goes live, start time
5:00 pm at the International Date Line
for 24 hours


Examples:

If you are in Eastern Daylight Time is UTC-5. the first time zone is 17 hours ahead, so for you the program begins at 12 am in June 21.

Central Europe/Central Africa is UTC+1; for you the program begins at 6 am, 11 time zones ahead.

Time zones earlier than midnight June 21 EDT begin June 20.

The full program runs 24 hours. http://www.solstice24.com


With a video and audio stream that will be archived after on Vimeo.

Visible worldwide, wherever you are!

Please send this invitation to your friends and fans. Ask them to send it to theirs.

Great to take this spin together. 

Regards,
Charlie and the SOL24 team

Charlie Morrow
Charles Morrow Productions LLC
New York  London  Berlin  Helsinki   San Francisco  Los Angeles  
Montreal  Washington D.C   Portland OR  Barton VT
www.cmorrow.com
+1 646 235 7228


Collection Highlight E153696: Painted Spoon

E153696
This is one of several beautifully painted wooden spoons in our collections from Alaska. This particular spoon was collected by J.H. turner and donated to the museum on March 9th, 1894 by the Bureau of American Ethnology. Many Circumpolar objects with varying shapes and uses have decorations in this style!

Explore more objects and images on our online database!


Collection Highlight E7733: Snow-goggles

E7733

Snow-goggles, most often made of carved wood, are a common object across a number of groups represented in the circumpolar ethnology collections. Snow-goggles are meant to be positioned on the face, over the eyes, and secured to the wearer’s head with a strap of skin or hide. The small opening in the goggles allows the wearer to see out, while protecting them from snow blindness—caused by the sun reflecting off the snow and bouncing harmful UV rays directly into one’s eyes causing temporary blindness. These particular goggles, collected by Roderick R. MacFarlane and accessioned into the collections in 1869, are different—they are made out of a wolverine’s head! If you look closely perhaps you can find the beading and embellishment added to them. While we can’t say for sure how, or if, these goggles may have been used differently than the more common wood goggles, it is safe to say they look pretty cool!

Explore more objects and images on our online database!


Collection Highlight E352229: Bag- Wood and Dressed Skin

E352229_ant-01-201705

This small bag, made of wood or reeds and dressed animal skin, was donated to the museum in 1931! Though the catalog card does not identify a collector, we know it was donated by The Museum of the Academy of Sciences, Leningrad, Russia. Collected near the Aldan and Lena Rivers area in Southeastern Siberia, Russia, the bag is associated with the Yakut (or Sakha) culture. Bags of this type, typically made from ox hide, were used to transport fermented mare’s milk (koumiss)! ‘This bag couldn’t hold much koumiss!’ you may be saying. In fact, this particular bag is most likely a model or a child’s version of the typical full sized bag!

Explore more objects and images on our online database!


Collection Highlight E394452: Cribbage Board

E394452

This cribbage board, made from a single walrus tusk, is beautifully decorated with scrimshaw—carving on whale bone or ivory which is colored with pigment! Cribbage, a card game invented in the 1600s, is historically a British invention and pastime, though it found its way to American shores on board ships throughout the later 19th and early 20th centuries alongside explorers and colonialists. Embellished boards such as this one, which are used to keep score, were likely made by Alaskan natives for sale to non-natives, as a market for tourist goods blossomed with the arrival of Europeans the late 1800s.

Although the history of the game is long, and scrimshaw was originally done on whaling ships beginning in the mid 1700’s, our cribbage board was collected from St. Lawrence Island by Mr. Edward D. Jones and accessioned into the museum in 1957. If you take a closer look at the detail images taken by our photographer, you can see the holes for the score keeping pegs (“spilikins”) evenly placed among the intricate scrimshaw work.

Explore more objects and images on our online database!


Become a 'Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic Legend' Exhibit Volunteer!!

Narwhal Recruitment Flyer

 

In August 2017 we will be opening a new exhibit Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic legend and are currently in the process of recruiting volunteers to interact with visitors in this exhibit and the Sant ocean hall. We will provide all the training necessary to prepare volunteers in September and they will start once they have completed the training. Volunteers would commit to coming into the museum eight hours a month for one year and must be 18 or older.

Volunteers will answer questions, spark conversations and engage visitors with cultural objects and marine specimens in the Narwhal exhibit and Sant Ocean Hall. The exhibits cover topics such as narwhal biology, Inuit culture, the effects of climate change in the Arctic, biodiversity in the ocean, fossil records of marine life, and human’s impact on the ocean and contain over 674 marine specimen. Volunteers will get the opportunity to learn directly from world renowned scientists, gain experience communicating the importance of our natural world to visitors, and much more.


Collection Highlight E332406: Seal Skin Bag Made with Fish Heads

E332406- composite
From a distance, this object looks like a relatively unremarkable, woven, lightly decorated bag. However, upon closer inspection you might notice that the bag is actually made of both sealskin and fish heads that have been stitched together (look for their eyes). Talk about unexpected materials!  This is just one example of so many in our collections of how circumpolar groups use the materials in innovative and effective ways that may be surprising to us non-circumpolar folks. For instance, conjoined fish heads would make a good water-resistant bag. Just like this delicately embroidered Work-Bag made of Sea Lion intestine. This bag was donated to the museum in 1926 by the National Museum of Denmark. It originates from the Inuit or Tunumiit people in Ammassalik County, Greenland.

Explore more objects and images on our online database!


Collection Highlight E43565: Extremely Tiny Walrus Belt Ornament

E043565_ant-06-201604.640x640

Carving this diminutive ivory walrus, used as a belt ornament, must have been very difficult—check out some of the amazing details former project photographer, Brittany Hance, was able to capture.

This belt ornament, shaped like a walrus, is so tiny! This object is one of many collected by Edward W. Nelson and accessioned in 1880. Nelson’s objects form one of the founding circumpolar collections—so stay tuned for more information about Nelson and other impactful collectors, and how their efforts shaped the study of Arctic cultures and impacted the lives of people in that region.

Explore more objects and images on our online database!