DCSIMG

Collection Highlight E48851: Shuttlecock

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This item from our collections perhaps seems unfamiliar at first, but if you take a closer look you might recognize a familiar object.  It’s a shuttlecock! Shuttlecocks, also referred to as “birdies”, are what get batted back and forth during a game of badminton. This shuttlecock has a head made of wound fibers, which serves as a weight, and a tail of feathers. The feathers, traditionally taken from only one wing of a bird, help keep the shuttlecock aerodynamic. These days we tend to use commercially manufactured plastic and rubber shuttlecocks. This object was donated by Edward Nelson, accessioned on Feb 9th, 1882, and collected near the Lower Yukon River.  

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Collection Highlight E153696: Painted Spoon

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This is one of several beautifully painted wooden spoons in our collections from Alaska. This particular spoon was collected by J.H. turner and donated to the museum on March 9th, 1894 by the Bureau of American Ethnology. Many Circumpolar objects with varying shapes and uses have decorations in this style!

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Collection Highlight E352229: Bag- Wood and Dressed Skin

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This small bag, made of wood or reeds and dressed animal skin, was donated to the museum in 1931! Though the catalog card does not identify a collector, we know it was donated by The Museum of the Academy of Sciences, Leningrad, Russia. Collected near the Aldan and Lena Rivers area in Southeastern Siberia, Russia, the bag is associated with the Yakut (or Sakha) culture. Bags of this type, typically made from ox hide, were used to transport fermented mare’s milk (koumiss)! ‘This bag couldn’t hold much koumiss!’ you may be saying. In fact, this particular bag is most likely a model or a child’s version of the typical full sized bag!

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